Friday, January 26, 2007

Saints I Missed (Oops!) From January 25

St Amarinus:

St. Amarinus
Feastday: January 25
Benedictine martyr, companion of St. Priest, or Praejectus. Amarinus was bishop of Clermont, France. The valley of Saint Amarian in Alsace, France, is named in his honor.

St Apollo:

St. Apollo
Feastday: January 25
Egyptian hermit, founder, and miracle worker. Apollo was born in Egypt and spent forty years in the desert region around Thebes. He then founded a community of monks in Hermopol, Egypt, ultimately numbering five hundred, and became their abbot. Apollo was eighty years old when he made this foundation. He was noted for his miracles.

St Artemas:

St. Artemas
Feastday: January 25
Martyr of Pozzuoli, Italy. He is traditionally described as a teenage boy in the Roman Empire who was stabbed to death with iron pens by pagan school classmates. This legend is doubtful, but Artemas was martyred at Pozzuoli, near Capua, in the fifth century, perhaps earlier.

St Bretannion:

St. Bretannion
Feastday: January 25
Bishop of Tomi, Romania, on the Black Sea. He was exiled by Emperor Valens for opposing the Arian heresy. The people of Tomi, however, forced the emperor to restore him to his see.

St Donatus:

St. Donatus
Feastday: January 25
Martyr with Sabinus and Agape. Nothing is known of their martyrdom.

St Dwynwen:

St. Dwynwen
Feastday: January 25
A Welsh saint credited with the saying: “Nothing wins hearts like cheerfulness.” A member of the family of Brychan of Brecknock, she is venerated throughout Wales and Cornwall, England.

St Eochod:

St. Eochod
Feastday: January 25
The Apostle of the Picts of Galloway, Scotland. He was one of the twelve chosen by St. Columba to evangelize northern Britain.

St Juventius & Maximus:

St. Juventius & Maximus
Feastday: January 25
Martyred members of the imperial guard in the service of Emperor Julian the Apostate. When they protested the emperor’s edicts on the veneration of relics, they were arrested, scourged, and beheaded at Antioch, Syria. St. John Chrysostom wrote their eulogy.

St Racho:

St. Racho
Feastday: January 25
First Bishop of Autun, France, under the Franks. He is also listed as Ragnobert. It is believed that St. Leodegarius was his successor

St Maurus:

St. Maurus
Feastday: January 25
6th century
With Placid, Benedictines, disciples of St. Benedict. Maurus was the son of a Roman noble. At the age of twelve he became St. Benedict’s assistant and possibly succeeded him as abbot of Subiaco Abbey in 525 . Pope St. Gregory I the Great wrote of Maurus and Placid in his Dialogues. In liturgical art, Maurus is depicted saving Placid from drowning. Their cult is now restricted to local calendars.

St. Peter Thomas
Feastday: January 25
Carmelite Latinpatriarch and papal legate. Peter was born in Gascony, France and joined the Carmelites while still a young man. In 1342 he was appointed procurator of the order and, from Avignon, he oversaw the organization and government of the Carmelites. As Avignon was then the seat of the popes, he entered into their service, attracting papal attention because of his skills as a preacher and his elo­quence. Named to the papal diplomatic service, he held the post of papal legate to Genoa, Milan, and Venice, and was appointed bishop of Patti and Lipari in 1354, bishop of Coron in 1359, archbishop of Candia in 1363, and titular Patriarch of Constantinople in 1364. At the behest of Pope Urban V, he journeyed to Serbia, Hungary, and Constantinople in an effort to organize a crusade against the Turks. He took part in a military operation against Alexandria, Egypt, in 1365 during which he was severely wounded. He died from his injuries at Cyprus a few months later. While never formally canonized, his feast was permitted to the Carmelites in 1608.

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